Nancy Esslemont

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  • in reply to: EICR #3361872
    Nancy Esslemont
    Keymaster

    Really helpful comments as always – thanks evryone! – below confirmation from Chris Edwards, our Electrical Technical Safety Manager –

    The Landlord and Tenant Act places an obligation on the landlord to demonstrate that they have provided a property that is fit for human habitation at the beginning of a tenancy, and this is the main driver for voids to be automatically tested
    Best practice ,ref the Landlord and Tenants Act, indicates an EICR should be completed in these circumstances to demonstrate condition and resetting the date for the cyclical EICR.

    NB BS7671 states that a minor works cert is intended to be used for additions and alterations to an installation that do not extend to the provision of a new circuit. Therefore the above outlined work should be completed on an Electrical Installation Certificate.

    Nancy Esslemont
    Keymaster

    Hi Richard – i’ll cover with Kim and Chris to see if we can fit in on this round of meetings or at least mention in AOB for discussion
    Best wishes Nancy

    Nancy Esslemont
    Keymaster

    Chris Edwards, AESM Technical Safety Manager comments:-

    This is unfortunately another example of non specific guidance and, as mentioned in previous posts, demonstrates reluctance to issue a one size fits all, and potentially ineffective, guideline.
    The burden is on the landlord to ensure that where a landlord provides an electrical appliance as part of a tenancy, the law expects the appliance will be maintained in a safe condition that will not cause harm to the tenant. Portable appliance testing is not currently a legal requirement, but it is considered to be best practise and one way of demonstrating planned preventative maintenance. The issue, as always, is how often should these be performed.
    A risk assessment should be completed, taking into account the type of equipment, frequency of use, working environment etc. Portable appliance testing doesn’t need to be conducted annually unless specific risks indicate that it should be. However, you should to be able to demonstrate that the appliances are being inspected and / or tested at intervals that reflect the risk. An inspection doesn’t need to be performed by a fully qualified tester, but by someone who may have relatively frequent access and that is deemed competent to do so. So with a little training, this could be performed by anyone who has frequent access to the property i.e. liaison officer or similar, as long as records of the checks are kept.
    There is reference material available, which in some cases refers to privately rented accommodation, but ultimately addresses the same risks.
    The assessment of the risks would be performed accordingly.
    Useful links below:-
    Maintaining Portable Electrical Equipment HSG10 https://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg107.htm
    Electrical Safety First Best Practise Guide 6 https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/professional-resources/best-practice-guides/
    Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments https://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg236.htm
    Electrical Safety and You https://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg231.pdf

    Nancy Esslemont
    Keymaster

    Legislative detail to follow shortly from Legislation.gov.uk. Will keep members posted.

    in reply to: BS5839-9 Update #159193
    Nancy Esslemont
    Keymaster

    We are currently working through the BSI Code of Practice update material and will post conclusions here shortly. Coming up straight after the Part 6 Revision, means a clear, structured plan is required as soon as possible, whether this can be linked to 5 yearly inspections or not. We will keep all members posted.

    in reply to: Surge Protection #17047
    Nancy Esslemont
    Keymaster

    This is already becoming a common question among AESM members and , as there is scant evidence of many issues with overvoltage surges in the last few years, a number of organisations are reviewing the total value of the installation and equipment to determine if such protection is necessary. The need for SPDs will depend on many differing factors. These include the level of exposure of a building to lightning-induced voltage transients, the sensitivity and value of the equipment, the type of equipment used within the installation, and whether there is equipment within the installation that could generate voltage transients.
    As the demand for higher spec technical equipment – 4k TVs and high spec audio equipment – grows, some organisations are recommending contractors at least ‘offer’ this option.
    In order to make informed decisions it would be good to know to what degreee members have experienced over voltage surges.
    In light of this we will shortly be emailing all members and associates to ask this specific question and will discuss the results at this Spring’s AESM Technical meetings – keep a look out for your email!”

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